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Rodanthe Aug 9-16

Fly fishing the Outer Banks of North Carolina
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Rodanthe Aug 9-16

Postby mb82 » Mon Aug 10, 2009 7:00 pm

Here we go the daily reports from my vacation.

Today caught some menhaden and blues in the morning like I mentioned in the corolla surf report.
This afternoon my BIL and I took the yaks beyond the breakers. Water temp is dropping fast and the water is clear. We headed out maybe 300-400 yards and started fishing. Well no bites out there but nearly two cases of dirty underwear. We both turned around to a splash to see a 6ft shark between us maybe 5 yards from each of us. Well after reeling in very fast we decided it was time to paddle in. While padding it another bait ball was forming off the beach. After playing around there for an hour we didn't have a bite, though my BIL had a triggerfish hanging out around his kayak for a while, it had no interest in the hopkins spoon he was throwing.

Going to finish rigging the rest of the rods tonight I think. Fly fishing off the beach is going to be tough with the numbers of people walking the beach and how close they like to walk to people fishing.

All in all this has been some of the best fishing down here I have seen in years.

Stay tuned for tomorrows incredible installment of Fishing on the Island.
Jeff G
Generally found under a bridge somewhere.

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Re: Rodanthe Aug 9-16

Postby wgmiller » Mon Aug 10, 2009 8:31 pm

mb82 wrote:Fly fishing off the beach is going to be tough with the numbers of people walking the beach and how close they like to walk to people fishing.

All in all this has been some of the best fishing down here I have seen in years.


Nothing a Clouser on the backcast can't take care of! :D

Thanks for the news on the fishing; looking forward to my trip in two weeks...

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Re: Rodanthe Aug 9-16

Postby mb82 » Tue Aug 11, 2009 8:07 am

wgmiller wrote:
Nothing a Clouser on the backcast can't take care of! :D

Thanks for the news on the fishing; looking forward to my trip in two weeks...


Yeah to each person on the beach.

When I pulled the kayak up yesterday I did have to spend about a half hour explaining to people that you can flyfish in saltwater. I felt like I was at work wearing a swimsuit.
Jeff G
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Re: Rodanthe Aug 9-16

Postby mb82 » Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:11 pm

Fished this morning oceanside and nothing. Headed out after dinner caught more of those croaker on fishbites with my BIL till we looked behind us and saw lightning and decided to head back in.
Jeff G
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Re: Rodanthe Aug 9-16

Postby 9ft4wt » Wed Aug 12, 2009 10:41 am

Keep the reports coming Jeff. Glad to hear you are catching fish.

People on the beach are a pain. They are totally oblivious to the fact that you are fly fishing and your fly might well rip their ear off. LOLEMSCs (Little old lady early morning shell collectors) are the worst.

I always figure the pedestrians have the right of way and watch out for them cause they surely are not going to watch out for themselves. Sometimes it means you have to move or even stop fishing, but I figure it is better to be safe.

9ft4wt

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Re: Rodanthe Aug 9-16

Postby Piscator » Wed Aug 12, 2009 12:26 pm

Reminds me of the last time I was on the west side jetty at OI. I'm standing on the very end, with no one within a hundred yards. A bit later a fellow comes up and walks out onto the jetty and comes all the way over, right up behind me. He parks himself within a few feet of my casting arm. I start making conversation and eventually I politely pointed out that as a fly fisher I needed a little more room than a normal fisherman. His reply was simply "there's plenty of room for both of us." The only two people on a hundred foot jetty, not only does he come right beside me but he wouldn't move a few feet further back for someone who was already there. :| Needless to say, after a few casts with the big clouser whizzing around him, he eventually decided to fish elsewhere.

I agree though about pedestrians. Gotta give em the ride of way, and assume they have no idea about fly fishing. Even if they watch you cast, they usually have no qualms about walking through your back cast. But the best are the dog owners who think it's cute for their pets to go traipsing and swimming through the water right infront of you.

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Re: Rodanthe Aug 9-16

Postby mb82 » Wed Aug 12, 2009 4:20 pm

Nothing I can do about the pedestrians, heck even Dad walked within 10 ft behind me this morning right as I was about to backcast.

Fished this afternoon with HH65 and his family at OI. 2 lizard fish and a gull for me. Add one new caught species. That was till the weather rolled in. Looking forward to tomorrow.
Jeff G
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Re: Rodanthe Aug 9-16

Postby Piscator » Wed Aug 12, 2009 8:41 pm

is that referring to the gull or the lizardfish? :D

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Re: Rodanthe Aug 9-16

Postby mb82 » Thu Aug 13, 2009 7:28 am

Piscator wrote:is that referring to the gull or the lizardfish? :D

The gull. I have caught lizard fish before, though these two could eat the one I caught.
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Re: Rodanthe Aug 9-16

Postby 9ft4wt » Thu Aug 13, 2009 10:27 am

This is a little long so I apologize in advance. Except for a wee bit of exagerration, this is true:

My brother and I took our wives to Naples last year. They did the beach, shopping thing and we fished.
One day when it was slow, we went out on a pier.

All I had was a fly rod and he had a spinner with a collection of plastic baits. Not ideal for pier fishing. I rigged a small Clouser and a gotcha and started jigging for palm-sized jacks and different little snappers. I was tearing them up on my 5wt.
My brother was getting bubkus. So I rigged him up with the same flies and we put a one ounce sinker on the end of his line. He was immediately into fish.

Now it just so happens that the pier was literally surrounded by pelicans floating in the water. When you hooked a fish you had to get it in fast or the pelicans would be on it pronto. If it flopped off your hook on the way up it was bird food. Throwing them back in you had to time it for when the birds were looking the other way. We got pretty good at it and the big bills only got a couple of our fish.

Anyway my brother hooked a fish and was a little slow on the uptake. A pelican was immediately all over it. The bird ripped the fish off the hook but the trailing Clouser lodged in its wing with the weight wrapped around it.

I yelled: “Don’t try to bring him in, we can walk it down the pier and beach it!”

Too late he lifted on his rod, the bird went berserk and the 6 pound spinning line parted. Unable to fly, the pelican was screaming like crazy and drifting away.

We both felt sick but really did not know what to do. We quit fishing and told the guy at the gate what had taken place. He said, “It happens.”

Feeling glum, we went and sat on the beach with the wives. About 30 minutes later we noticed a big crowd about 200 yards down the shore.

My wife said, “There must be some sort of sea animal down there. Maybe it is a turtle or a seal. Let’s go see.”

The gals took off. I told my brother, “Grab the beach blanket.” He said “what for?’ I said “that’s our bird.” He said “Holy sH!$! You think so?”

I got out my knife and pliers and we started walking down the beach. As we approached, sure enough it was our pelican. It was about 25 yards off shore, being pushed unerringly by the current toward the beach. In moments it would be caught by the waves and tossed to the shore.

Above the baleful cries of the bird, we could hear the voices of the throng: ‘What’s wrong with it?” “Is it sick?” “Did a shark bite it?” “The birdy's not going to die is it, mommy?” Can’t anybody save it?”

“Ok, here is the plan,” I told my brother. “We are each going to hold an end of the blanket and walk out into the water. As the bird rises on the wave we are going to cover it with the blanket wrap it up, brink it to shore and perform surgery.”

“Do you know what the hell you are doing?” he asked. “Think George,” I said.

“George? Think George what heck is that suppose to mean?

“George. You know from Seinfeld. George and the whale,” I said with a grin.

“Aha,” he said

In my most authoritative voice, I yelled, “Please step aside give us some room. We are here to save the pelican.”

Like the red sea, the crowd parted, and we made our way to the water’s edge. Behind me I heard a small voice ask, “Who are they mommy? Are they animal police? Are they going to help the birdie?”

“Shush, Davey. Keep quiet and let the men do their work.”

With the crowd watching, we waded out to within striking distance.

“If we get too close, it is going to try to get back out to sea by flapping its wings. We need to time it just right. As it is being lifted by the wave, we need to rush out and scoop it up.”

“Roger that,” my brother said.

Our timing was perfect. The bird was on the crest of the wave. One wing spread, the other drooping from the weight and line tangled in it, the pelican was about to topple as the wave broke. We rushed in scooped it up, wrapped it in the blanket.

As we waded with the patient back to shore, a soft round of applause rose from the crowd. I raised my free hand to still them: “Thank you, thank you. But please our job is only half done. Make some room, please.”

We laid the bird gently on the ground. My brother secured its head and body so it could not move. I peeled that blanket back to expose the wing. A volunteer from the crowd stepped forward to hold the legs.

Staring at me from the fleshy area between the radius and the ulna, were the bright red, lead eyes of a size 6 chartreuse and white Clouser. About 12 feet of mono was wrapped around the ulna and metacarpals preventing the bird from extending its wing.

Using my line nippers, I cut through the mono, freeing the weight. Now only the fly remained in the bird’s wing. Seeking, yet another volunteer to hold the wing steady while I performed the next part of the procedure, I noticed that the beach goers had hemmed us in, inching ever closer to get a bird’s eye view (so to speak) of the operation.

“For God’s sake, ladies and gentlemen, give us room. This is a matter of life and death.” Sure, it was a little over the top but I was starting to get into the role.

One and all took about two steps back.

The silence as I reached for my pliers was so complete, that I swear I could hear the heart of that gallant bird beating.

Deftly, I used the cutter to shear the shank of the fly. Grabbing the bend, I pulled the rest of the hook through the skin. The wing seemed to be fine.

Thank goodness it was not broken.

“Stand back now. Give the bird some room we are going to let it go.” Again, like a receding wave, the crowd fell back.

The pelican clumsily regained its feet. Spread its wings, took a few awkward steps and then soared out over the water, executing a perfect banked turn as it headed back to the pier.

The crowd burst into shouts of joy and applause. Strangers clapped us on the back and shook our hands. Women hugged us and pecked us on the cheek. “Who are you? Are you veterinarians?”

“No Mamm, just beach goers like yourselves, who care about the life of a helpless animal,” my brother said. He was getting into the role now, too.

“What happened to that poor bird?” another person asked.

“Some jerk wad fisherman hooked him and tangled it in the line. Then didn’t know how to properly release it,” I said, giving my brother a wink.

“People like that should be shot,” said the woman.

“I couldn’t agree with you more,” I said. At that, my brother was quickly moving back up the beach.

On the way back to our umbrella, both our wife’s kissed us and told us how wonderful we had been and how proud of us they were.

My brother and I have a lifelong pact to never reveal to them, the full story….

9ft4wt
Last edited by 9ft4wt on Thu Aug 13, 2009 1:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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