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Wade Fishing Spots

Fly fishing the Outer Banks of North Carolina
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Wade Fishing Spots

Postby NESportsman » Thu Jun 11, 2009 4:26 pm

Hi folks, I am a new member to the board, and I will be coming down to visit on 6/27/09 with my 8wt, 9wt and 10 wt fly rods - oh yeah, I'm bringing my family down too ;) We are staying on Four Seasons Lane in Duck.

Without publicly burning any spots, is anybody willing to give me some advice as to where I may be able to catch my first puppy/red drum on a fly rod while wading? An email or PM is fine if you don't want to identify any spot on the board.

Are there places close to Duck, or should I head South towards Oregon Inlet?

I have read the OBX Wade Fishing post that mentioned some areas around Oregon Inlet. I would like to know is it a 5 minute or 50 minute drive from where we are staying to Oregon Inlet?

I thank you in advance for your help. I will re-pay the favor if you ever head into New England for some fishing.....

Ed Hudon
Byfield, MA
enhudon@gmail.com
Ed Hudon
Byfield, MA

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Re: Wade Fishing Spots

Postby BCflyfisher2012 » Thu Jun 11, 2009 6:48 pm

I can't answer the location question for you because I myself am still learning but as to the driving time, it is about 50 minutes from Duck if you follow the speed limit.
Bradley

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Re: Wade Fishing Spots

Postby bhorsley » Thu Jun 11, 2009 9:26 pm

it is a 50 minute drive and the fishing is better around OI. Hopefully Tracy will find this post and chime in--he is the master wader. AS for reds/puppy drums--good question --i have not caught one this year. Kepp posting you should get some good info form this crowd
growing old ain't for sissies
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Re: Wade Fishing Spots

Postby nSearchOfFlyH20 » Fri Jun 12, 2009 7:54 am

Read the Spring on OBX post. It is very detailed and specific. There are a few more but I always spend my time at the spots mentioned there. Doesn't get any better then there....does it guys????

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Re: Wade Fishing Spots

Postby Cutter » Fri Jun 12, 2009 9:40 am

When we go to Corolla, I fish in the surf with bloodworms for the kids to have fun, but I take the flyrods south for me.
The world is your oyster-
So show up with a knife and know how to shuck.

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Re: Wade Fishing Spots

Postby flyinby » Fri Jun 12, 2009 7:38 pm

Same here, I've got an uncle in Duck, we bloodworm and cutbait the beach , play with the kids and drink beer, but when I'm looking for big fish, I'd book a trip with Flat out or Fly girl... Money vs. time...

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Re: Wade Fishing Spots

Postby hh65cdr » Mon Jun 15, 2009 1:19 pm

NEsportsman. I would be glad to show you around however I will be out of town the weekend you get here. I will be back the 29th and off all that week. Will you still be here?
Once you kill a cow, you got to make a burger.

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Re: Wade Fishing Spots

Postby mdfish » Tue Jun 16, 2009 8:56 am

You are required to have a fishing license over the age of 16 surf or sound right?

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Re: Wade Fishing Spots

Postby tomdincher » Tue Jun 16, 2009 11:56 am

I will be staying in Duck in late July and have the same interest as nEfisherman. I don't know the jargon. What and where is the "Spring on OBX Post? Thanks.
Tom Dincher (tdincher@comcast.com)


nSearchOfFlyH20 wrote:Read the Spring on OBX post. It is very detailed and specific. There are a few more but I always spend my time at the spots mentioned there. Doesn't get any better then there....does it guys????

:D

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Re: Wade Fishing Spots

Postby bhorsley » Tue Jun 16, 2009 2:06 pm

Spring is the time for fishing, getting out of the office or house and into the outdoors. After a long winter of thinking, many light-tackle anglers are going to take the plunge and try their hand at saltwater fly fishing. Our website activity picks up in early spring with questions from new saltwater fly anglers as well as seasoned anglers making their first venture to the Outer Banks. Luckily for all of us, fly fishing on the Banks is not very complicated—no bug hatches to determine and no nymphs to drift! There are just a few things needed¾rod, reel, fly line, a few flies and water.

Rods
Fly anglers looking to gear up for the Outer Banks sounds should look for a medium-fast to fast-action, 9 foot, 7- to 9-weight fly rod. These rods will handle all that a redfish, schoolie striper, bluefish and speckled trout can throw at you. Most fly rod manufacturers, including Sage, make several rods in a variety of price ranges for saltwater use. Sage’s entry-level rod is the Discovery. The VPS series is Sage’s middle-priced rod and it’s an excellent but often overlooked model. The two high-performance models made by Sage are the RPLXi, a saltwater standard, and the newer XPs. All of these rods come with a lifetime warranty.

Reels
In most cases when fishing in the sound the fly reel is just a method for holding line. Most of the target species in the waters behind the Outer Banks are known for their hard strikes and bulldog attitude rather than long blistering runs. Like fly rods, there are many choices in reels. The first thing to look for is the size. Find a reel that is made for the size of your rod. Reels can be sized for two or three rod sizes. If you choose an 8-weight rod, look for a reel that will hold at least 150 yards of 20-pound backing and an 8-weight fly line. The most important thing to look for is saltwater compatibility. Many freshwater reels will turn to dust after a few outings in salt water. Lamson Velocity and the Ross Cimarron are two makes that will perform perfectly without breaking the bank. Tibor introduced a new reel this year call the Back Country Wide. It is built to Tibor/Pates tough standards, is priced right and looks bulletproof.

Line
The most useful type of fly line for fishing the waters behind the Outer Banks is the intermediate fly line. This line is the most effective for wading anglers. Intermediate fly lines are the slowest sinking lines and come in most sizes. Most of the waters fly anglers fish is between 2 and 5 feet deep. An intermediate fly line and a 7- to 9-foot leader will let you get the fly down into the strike zone. The slow sink rate allows anglers to count down and fish different parts of the water column. If stripped quickly, an intermediate fly line is fine for popper fishing. The only other type of fly line that might be needed is a sink tip. Particularly if anglers are fishing fast water or around the Manns Harbor bridge. Most of these lines have a sinking tip from 24- to 32-feet long and the sinking deeps is rated in grains. A 7-weight fly rod will handle a tip weight from 225 to 300 grains. An 8-weight will handle 225 to 350 grains, and a 9-weight will handle 225 to 425 grains.

The Manns Harbor bridge is an excellent spot for stripers, and they bite best when there is some current. Line that is from 300 to 450 grains is the most effective. When using sink-tip lines, use shorter leaders. Short leaders keep the fly close to the end of the line so the weight of the line will pull the fly down. Long leaders will slow the sink of the fly and negate the effect of the sinking line.

Flies
Armed with a small selection of flies, anglers can accurately fish the waters behind the Outer Banks. There are three core patterns every fly box should include. They are: Clouser Minnows, Lefty’s Deceivers and the Kreh and Clouser combination called the Half-and-Half. Start with Clousers in sizes #2 to 2/0 in chartreuse and white, black over orange, black over red, and green over white. Lefty’s Deceivers can be tied on #1 to 2/0 hooks and in colors of chartreuse and white, gray and white, and green and white. Half-and–Halfs can be tied on 1/0 to 3/0 hooks in chartreuse and white, green and white, and olive and white. If the water is very dirty from rain or wind, try any of those flies in black with purple flash. The core patterns are not the only effective patterns; there are many more patterns and colors that catch the fish. Some of the biggest fun is trying and tying new patterns and seeing if they work.

Waters
There are numerous wading spots, enough to fill a book, but I am going to mention two that are the easiest to fish and access. Both of these locations are on the north side of Oregon Inlet. The first one is the Bodie Island Lighthouse Visitor Center. Traveling south towards Oregon Inlet it is on the right side of the road marked by a brown National Park Service sign. Turn in and head toward the lighthouse. When you arrive at the visitor center you will pass a dirt road with a gate across it. Anglers can park on the side of the road. Follow the dirt road until it comes out a creek. This is Blossies Creek or Off Island Gun Club. Fish up and down the creek. It is a prime spring spot for stripers and speckled trout. In years past ebb tide was the best tide to fish.

A few miles south of Bodie Island Visitor Center is the Oregon Inlet Fishing Center. The fishing center is at the foot of the bridge to Hatteras Island. Park in public parking at the southeast side of the fishing center.. The big propeller in the parking lot gives the slough its name—Propeller Slough. It is best to prospect here on dead low water. The sloughs will be easier to find and you can learn your way around. The most productive time to fish here is the incoming tide after dead low water or a few hours after high water on an ebbing tide. This spot is very good in the summer for speckled trout, croakers, flounder and puppy drum.

All of the spots are safe with mostly hard sand bottoms except spots at Bodie Island Lighthouse. Take a few mornings and learn these places and excellent spring fishing can be just a step away Brian Horsley
growing old ain't for sissies
Pure-T-Mommicked

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